{THE PILL BOX } spacer
spacer
spacer
powered by blogger

{Saturday}

 
"DON'T TOUCH ME UNLESS YOU LOVE ME ..."

Vamping off of Mark at k-punk's admissions about actors he likes who are not rated by "more discerning" friends & critics & others ...

I want to stand up here in this Church basement this morning and confess:

Hi, my name is Ian and I'm a Warren Beatty fan ...

I don't care what anyone says (or hearsays), as a figure I find him fascinating (the same way he finds Howard Hughes and Bugsy Siegel fascinating, and possibly for similar reasons) and whatever you say about him, his films tend to be aswarm with women, and different types of women, not (as per most forever-thus Hollywood male stars and power players), one type of "woman" or (as per Scorsese) just one woman per film.
{Did you know that Pretty Woman started out as a fascinatingly murky ambiguously 'moral' hard edged tale scripted by Donald Cammell? Before the SUITS got their hands on it? And turned the Julia Roberts character into every Hollywood uber agent Eszterhas wannabe misogynist's cream dream cliche ...}

E.g., Bugsy (like Bonnie & Clyde) is, properly, a duet; but I think people are so blinded by the "public" Beatty (and this is partly his own fault) that they don't see the craftsman Beatty, or the canny Beatty ... before the credits of Bugsy have even ended, he's seduced someone - but SONICALLY, in sound only, in sound alone, and but he doesn't exaggerrate the sound of the other's pleasure, it's a convincing sound, and it's convincingly spun around/about the Other while still hinting at narcissistic rewards of Power and control being creamed off on the side as it were ...
And in Bugsy there's - I ADMIT IT - the Bad Celt part of me that exults in his psychopathic jealous possessive anger, like, when he beats someone half to death (becos the guy called Virginia a slut) and then, adjusting his hair and clothes, says "You should be glad I didn't drink much today" well, I admit that when I first saw it I whooped and hollered ...

{as for his post Bugsy career, well, Bulworth was 1000 times more risky and fascinating than we have any right to expect A MAINSTREAM Hollywood film to be, but for the rest, uh ...

{Bugsy also has the loveliest Morricone score, ooh my ...}

In Shampoo that wonderful fumbling perplexed "speech" about his promiscuity which ends with: "I may not love them but nobody's going to tell me I dont like them ..."

(Alan Rudolph and MAYBE Paul Thomas Anderson: honourable exceptions.}

But I really can't put it better than these quotes, selected from a great article on Beatty by Stephanie Zacharek at Salon.com

"
[...]
his chief sin in the eyes of the public may have been knowing all too well how to look at a woman - how to look at her and really see her.

[...]
if the only evidence a movie audience has of an actor's heart is what we see on-screen, then Beatty has probably opened his more honestly, and more nakedly, than any actor of his generation. When his eyes light on Faye Dunaway in "Bonnie and Clyde," it's as if the world has suddenly opened up around him - the exact opposite of locking an object of desire up in the shackles of appraisal and assessment.

[...]
Beatty's George is the heart of Shampoo, and you can feel it in the way he practically falls apart, nearly every time, at the sight of the one girlfriend he deeply and truly loves, Christie's Jackie.

[...]
In McCabe & Mrs. Miller, Beatty is an un-likely Casanova - and yet maybe more than in any other performance he represents the essence of trembling, delightful, uncertain yet exceedingly selfless love. He yields; she takes, and it's a heartrending equation.

[...]
Beatty's great subtlety as an actor comes from that openheartedness. In the old days, there was plenty of feminist lit about the tyranny of the male gaze - how dangerous it was for a woman to define herself as men see her. But the whole point of love is that lovers, men and women alike, shouldn't look at each other in just any old way. Beatty's McCabe may be perpetually confused, but he gives Christie's Mrs. Miller the world in a single glance, over and over again. There's a defiant order to his unselfishness, and there's great beauty in it, too.

[...]
In his best moment in McCabe & Mrs. Miller, he stumbles around his room, mumbling in stream-of-consciousness free verse, as he musters the courage to go talk to her, to really make her listen to him for once. "I got poetry in me," he says, and the line jumps right out from its hazy context. It's a declaration of self-love, the kind of self-love that finds its truest home not in the reflection of a mirror, but in another person's eyes. Of course he's got poetry in him: He knows it, and we do too. It was there in the way he looked at her, as generous and compact as a sonnet. It's not the kind of thing you give just any girl.
"


posted by Ian 7/19/2003 12:18:00 PM

Comments: Post a Comment
spacer